Lost In Space – NEW May 2nd, 2014


Hubble Space Telescope Reaches Orbit

Hubble Space Telescope Reaches Orbit

(Hubble Space Telescope Reaches Orbit)

.

Welcome back MY Dear Readers to The Other Shoe. As well, a big ‘Other Shoe’ welcome to the very first May edition of ‘Lost in Space’! Fighting back a fever and sounding like I have gravel in my lungs, I am here to do my best at delivering another enjoyable edition of this wonderful article series. Today I have prepared four images from the Hubble Space Telescope and one video.

.

Yes, today’s edition is a bit ‘scaled back’ simply for the reason that I imagine that I have about two hours, maximum, before my fever and cough make working… impossible. Luckily I see my primary physician on Tuesday and he will likely prescribe some more great antibiotics to put this chest cold in its place. So, without further adieu, I present to you ‘Lost in Space’.

.

Our top image, above, is a picture of the Hubble Space Telescope in all its glory. I figured that since the majority of our images, here at ‘Lost in Space’ are taken by this space telescope I should pay homage by putting up a photo of Hubble. This image was taken on August 25th, 1990 with a handheld Hasselblad camera.[1] You can see that it is still attached to the shuttle by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) shortly after the deployment of the solar panels and antenna. Hubble was deployed during the five day mission STS-31.

.

For our next image I am sharing the single sharpest image of the very center of a ‘Starburst’ galaxy. This is an image of Messier 61[2] (aka NCG 4303). However, the real star (get it… star!?) of this image is the High Resolution Channel of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys which gave us this incredible image of our stellar neighbor. This galaxy is roughly 100,000 light years across, and comparable in size to our home the Milky Way Galaxy. Both Messier 61 and our Milky Way Galaxy belong to the Virgo Supercluster in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin) — a group of galaxy clusters containing up to 2,000 spiral and elliptical galaxies in total.

.

Hubble Views A Hungry Starburst Galaxy

Hubble Views A Hungry Starburst Galaxy

(Hubble Views A Hungry Starburst Galaxy)

.

Well, My Dear Readers, today’s adventure through the Hubble Space Telescope web site reminded me why I enjoy this work. While searching for images for today’s edition of ‘Lost in Space’… … … I received an education in astrophysics. It was a small education, but an education nonetheless. Today I learned about… … … (drum roll, please!) ‘Gravitational Lensing’. Two teams of astronomers, in gravitational lensing, employed our next image.[3] Gravitational Lensing is a process where astronomers use supernovae to magnify objects in remote universes.

.

“ “Because we can estimate the intrinsic brightness of the supernovae, we can measure the magnification of the lens.” Saurabh Jha of Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., a member of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) team.

.

So, below is a Hubble image that was used in this process of gravitational Lensing using supernovae as cosmic lenses.

.

Hubble Astronomers Use Supernovae to Gauge Power of Cosmic Lenses

Hubble Astronomers Use Supernovae to Gauge Power of Cosmic Lenses

(Hubble Astronomers Use Supernovae to Gauge Power of Cosmic Lenses)

.

Our next image comes from the globular cluster named Messier 5.[4] First discovered in 1702 by Gottfried Kirch Messier 5 is 24,550 light years from Earth. This is no ordinary globular cluster, My Dear Readers. Messier 5 is dates back 13 billion years, near the beginning of the Universe the ‘Big Bang’.

.

Hubble Astronomers Use Supernovae to Gauge Power of Cosmic Lenses

Hubble Astronomers Use Supernovae to Gauge Power of Cosmic Lenses

 (Hubble’s Cosmic Fairy Lights)

.

Our final image, for the day, is actually a reconstruction of images from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes database. Astronomers have applied an all new imaging processing technique to obtain near-infrared scattered light photos of five disks observed around young stars. The images used were of stars first imaged by Hubble’s Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) based on unusual heat signatures obtained from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the Infrared Astronomical Satellite that flew in 1983. This all-new process allows astronomers to glean even more information of already achieved images. Giving new life to old images.

.

Astronomical Forensics Uncover Planetary Disks in NASA's Hubble Archive

Astronomical Forensics Uncover Planetary Disks in NASA’s Hubble Archive

(Astronomical Forensics Uncover Planetary Disks in NASA’s Hubble Archive)

.

That brings us to the end of the images for this editions of ‘Lost in Space’. However, I still have one more gift to share with you, today. Below is a video, courtesy of NASA/JPL, of Hubble’s View of Comet ISON. So, sit back, relax and enjoy this wonderful video of images from Hubble.

.

.

And, with that, My Dear Readers, we come to the end of yet another edition of ‘Lost in Space’ here at The Other Shoe. I truly hope that you have enjoyed the images, and gain some insight from the science. It is always my pleasure to bring these images to you, My Dear Readers. I am trying to work on ‘The Horror in Smithville’… HONEST! My fever… coughing and hacking are really taking a huge toll. This toll effects my concentration, my ability to actually sit behind the keyboard and put words together. I am taking my medications and will hopefully be feeling better, soon.

.

Just as soon as I am able, I will finish then publish the much anticipated Part Eight of ‘The Horror in Smithville’. I just want everyone to know that I have not forgotten, nor have I decided not to continue. I am very anxious to return to Timmy and Archer and their adventure(s). When I do continue, it will be Friday and we will rejoin the boys as they finish up their morning chores, and get ready to ride the bus to school!

.

Till then… Adieu!

.

Thank YOU!

.

The Other Shoe eBay Store

The Other Shoe eBay Store

www.ebay.com/usr/enzomatrixlt

.

The Other Shoe's Daniel Hanning

The Other Shoe’s Daniel Hanning 2/2014

 


Advertisements

About Daniel Hanning
I am a; writer, editor and publisher. I write, most often, articles about our space program, fun videos andpolitical works. My most recent additions are; A Week In Review, Sunday Funnies and The Adventures of Nadia. Along with The Mars Report and Lost in Space. ENJOY!

2 Responses to Lost In Space – NEW May 2nd, 2014

  1. Pingback: FIVE HUNDRED ARTICLES a Reveiw & Celebration! #1 | The Other Shoe

  2. Pingback: FIVE HUNDRED ARTICLES a Reveiw & Celebration! #1 Redux | The Other Shoe

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Otrazhenie

Reflection

Allen's World

Personal Blog of Allen Hanning

J T Weaver

When you got nothing, you got nothing to lose. — Dylan.

Invisible Mikey

philosophic topics and the arts

tigerboose

a videolog about tigers

Hiking Photography

Beautiful photos of hiking and other outdoor adventures.

Movie Dr

Independent movie reviews and more...

palisadespete

10 Facts to Get You Started

The Other Shoe

Home to; 'Lost in Space', 'The Mars Report', 'News From Around the World', 'A Week In Review', and 'Sunday Funnies'

Ruijssantos's Blog

Na na na na naaaaa

%d bloggers like this: